HomepharmacyCalled an asynchronous magnetic bead rotation sensor Kopelman Kopelman lab at UM.

The device, called an asynchronous magnetic bead rotation sensor Kopelman Kopelman lab at UM. Early development of the sensor, also in the Kopelman lab, was primarily the work of Brandon McNaughton, who was a student at the time. McNaughton went to the UM spinoff Life Magnetics Inc. As chief technological officer found where that he is developing the device.

The technology could have far-reaching implications, said McNaughton.’At Life Magnetics we very excited and optimistic about the use of single cell sensitivity of the AMBR technology ,, the best antimicrobial develop in hours instead of days to determine, ‘he said. ‘This is a dramatic positive impact on patient and the health care system to reduce costs and save lives. In the United Statesate therapy and the overuse of antibiotics are major contributors to the problem of increased resistance in bacteria.Elect, and chosen Best leadership positions Infectious Diseases SocietyBarbara E. Professor and Director of which Division of Infectious Diseases the University of Texas Health Science Center at in Houston Medical School, voted Executive Committee of the Board of Directors to the Infectious Diseases Society of America .